Active Certification

The ACT Work Health and Safety Active Certification Policy has been developed as part of the ACT Government's overall work health and safety response to the Getting Home Safely report published in November 2012. The Active Certification Policy attempts to prevent fatal, permanent and serious debilitating injuries within the construction industry; and improve work health and safety practices on sites where ACT Government construction projects are being delivered. The Active Certification Policy commenced on 1 July 2013.

Changes to Active Certification
As of 1 July 2016, the ACT Government’s Active Certification Program (ACP) has changed. The ACP remains one of the key measures for maintaining the Government’s commitment to workplace health and safety, but changes are necessary to recognise the improvement in workplace safety that has taken place since the ACP was introduced, to better reflect current business practices, and to make better use of ACT resources.

What are the changes?

Many of the changes are intended to allow the Territory to allocate safety audit resources more efficiently. This includes diverting resources from audits of inactive or low risk worksites to new or high risk worksites. These changes include:

  • Commencing the 13-week audit cycle from start of work, rather than from possession of the site.
  • Allowing audits to be delayed up to four weeks to reflect changes in site possession, operations or other circumstances.
  • Allowing the government to waive an audit in the final four weeks of a project.
  • Allowing the government to determine appropriate audit arrangements for non-standard projects.
  • Allowing a scheduled audit to be waived—subject to the discretion of the government—where a project has received non-adverse reports from the two previous audits.
  • Allowing a single audit of multiple sites—subject to the discretion of the government—where a contractor has received non-adverse reports from the previous two audits of any of those sites. However, the first audit of any project, and the next scheduled audit of any particular site that has received an adverse report from the previous two audits, may not be waived.

Other changes are designed to:

  • Make the process fairer, by allowing the government to determine how to allocate points fairly where two audits occur within a short time and contractors could not reasonable be expected to have addressed the findings of the first audit.
  • Provide stronger oversight by specifying that Project Managers are subject to the same oversight and auditing arrangements as principal contractors.
    How will the changes affect workplace health and safety?

How will the changes affect workplace health and safety?

The changes should have no adverse impact on workplace health and safety monitoring and compliance. The amount of time and resources allocated to auditing will not change; in fact, the flexibility to allocate more resources to new or high risk sites will drive further improvements to workplace safety in the ACT.
What do I need to do?

What do I need to do?

The changes do not require any further compliance or reporting activity on the part of contractors. Notification of circumstances that may trigger the revised arrangements—such as the timing of site possession and project finalisation—will be determined through regular project management processes by the ACT Government in consultation with contractors and other stakeholders.
For more information please visit the ACT Procurement and Capital Works website at http://www.procurement.act.gov.au or contact ACT Superintendent of Works Michael Whitehouse on (02) 6205 7844.

File Name: Format: Size:
WHS Active Certification Policy Point Sanction Classifications Updated 14 January 2014 PDF

705kb

WHS Active Certification Policy Statement Updated July 2016 PDF

667kb

WHS Active Certification Policy Overview Updated 12 February 2014 - a revised Overview will be published shortly PDF 

224kb

 Principal Contractors Monthly WHS Report v1 Updated 02 October 2014.docWord 61kb